U.N. Peacekeeping Operations in Africa

As of September 2019, there are seven U.N. peacekeeping operations in Africa:

*the U.N. Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA),

* the U.N. Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA),

* the U.N. Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA),

* the U.N. Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS),

* the U.N. Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO),

* the African Union-United Nations Mission in Darfur (UNAMID), and

* the U.N. Mission for the Organization of a Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO).

The United States, as a permanent member of the U.N. Security Council, plays a key role in establishing, renewing, and funding U.N. peacekeeping operations, including those in Africa. For 2019, the U.N. General Assembly assessed the U.S. share of U.N. peacekeeping operation budgets at 27.89%; since the mid-1990s Congress has capped the U.S. payment at 25% due to concerns that the current assessment is too high. During the Trump Administration, the United States generally has voted in the Security Council for the renewal and funding of existing U.N. peacekeeping operations, including those in Africa. At the same time, the Administration has been critical of U.N. peacekeeping activities—both overall and in Africa specifically—and called for a review of operations to ensure that they are “fit for purpose” and to improve their efficiency and effectiveness.    Purchase this Volume